Talent united with diversity

By the time she was 19, Marianne Farley knew that her career would take place under the lights. She recorded a song album in Quebec from which several songs made the top 10.

In the wake of this achievement, she recorded an adaptation of her CD, Histoire Sans Prénom, for the French market. But acting had always been her passion, so she decided to focus all of her energy on becoming a film actor. Her talent was quickly recognized.

Marianne was born and raised in Montreal, Quebec and has been an actress for over 16 years. She is bilingual, having worked in both English and French productions.  

Marianne Farley

She began with parts on shows for a young audience like Big Wolf on Campus, Vampire High and Seriously Weird. Then, being fully bilingual, she became a librarian in Macaroni Tout Garni, a very popular children’s show.

Following this, she had a starring role in the thriller La Peau Blanche (White Skin), which won the Best First Feature Film award at the Toronto Film Festival and the Claude Jutras award at the Genies.

Following this success she landed hefty parts in Les Invincibles, Nos Étés and in Les Rescapés, three first-rate prime time series in Quebec.

In the U.S. she played in The Dead Zone and had supporting roles in TV movies Christmas Choir (Hallmark network), Forbidden Secrets and No Brother of Mine. Marianne can be seen in the films Imaginaerum, a Finnish-Quebecois co-production directed by Stobe Harju and Uvanga, Marie-Helene Cousineau’s 2nd feature film.

A true lover of the seventh art, Marianne has also produced four short films, one of which, Mon Cher Robert, got a nomination at the 2010 Jutra awards, and she is currently developing 2 feature film scripts. In August of 2014, she directed her first short film entitled Saccage.

“My passion has always been to act,” said Marianne. “If I weren’t acting, I’d probably be a director.”

Even though she liked to sing, she became an actress a few years later. Ultimately, it’s where she wanted to be in entertainment.

In April 2014, Marianne had the opportunity to experience a different culture when she filmed the movie, Uvanga, which means “myself” or “self-discovery.” She loved being able to work with people from other countries, and getting the chance to communicate with them.

In 2012, Marianne played the role of Gem Whitman in Imaginaerum, a movie written by the Finnish band Nightwish. Gem was portrayed as a cold and distant girl who was indirectly hurt by her father (played by Tuomas Holopainen, founder and leader of Nightwish).

“I felt it was easy to get into her skin because I understand wanting to close yourself up in order to protect yourself,” she said. “It felt awesome to play her role, someone who was angry and would constantly lash out.”

Marianne has recently finished shooting Villeray, a short comedy film about Montreal neighbours confronted by the diversity of their respective lifestyles and ideals.

For more information about Marianne Farley, visit her website.  

Contemporary fingerstyle guitar with a modern edge

Published on FAME Canada, Oct. 17, 2014

Calum Graham just turned 23 at the end of October this year, and has already enjoyed a career that would be the envy of artists double his age.

Born in British Columbia and raised in High River, Alta., this guitarist and singer/songwriter has released four acclaimed albums, won major musical competitions, performed at the Olympic games in both Vancouver and London, and has racked up phenomenal views on YouTube.

Canadian singer/songwriter Calum Graham

This past year, Calum was named one of the top 30 guitarists under 30 by Acoustic Guitar Magazine.

“He’s the most promising young guitarist I’ve seen,” said Andy McKee, one of today’s most popular acoustic guitarists. “His command of the guitar is really impressive.”

Calum’s musical journey first took flight at age 13 when he started playing the guitar. Five years later in the summer of 2010, he attended the Canadian Guitar Festival and entered the prestigious Canadian Fingerstyle Guitar competition. The judges awarded Calum with a first place finish after being impressed with his original compositions.

“This was one of the best experiences of my entire life,” he said. “It really inspired me to keep going with my music.”

His winning performance has garnered almost 1 million views on YouTube.

As Calum Graham’s name continued to grow in Alberta and across Canada for his guitar work and musicianship, he proved that his talents weren’t limited to his extraordinary ability to play the guitar.

In 2011, Graham won the Canada’s Walk of Fame nationwide “A Song For Canada” contest based on his poetic acuteness. His winning poem was used in the song “I’m Here, (A Song For Canada)”.

The song was performed by Chantal Kreviazuk and co-written by Graham, Raine Maida (Our Lady Peace) and Stephen Moccio (“I Believe”, 2010 Vancouver Olympics theme song/”Wrecking Ball”, Miley Cyrus).”

“Calum’s entry resonated strongly among the judges. His poem celebrates the cultural mosaic that is Canada,” said Moccio. “He has captured the diversity of this country – something that we as a nation are renowned for and proud of.”

In the late winter of 2012, and with two albums already under his belt (Sunny Side Up (2009), Indivisibility (2012), Graham teamed up with iconic Fingerstyle Guitarist Don Ross. The result was the instrumental acoustic duet album titled 12:34.

Recorded at famed “Metalworks Studios” (Prince, Tina Turner, RUSH, Drake), and released through CandyRat Records (world’s biggest acoustic guitar label), the album featured six originals by Graham, three by Ross, and a cover of OutKast’s hit song, “Hey Ya”.

Not long after the release of 12:34, Graham saw a loyal following begin to grow and it wasn’t long before his unique sound started to find a wide and appreciative audience.

In November of 2013, Graham released a solo instrumental album titled Phoenix Rising (CandyRat Records). The title song has already generated over 830,000 hits, with other songs also notching impressive numbers. The success of the album enabled Graham to expand his global fan base and he soon began touring internationally, both on his own and with the likes of Don Ross and Andy McKee.

Graham is currently preparing to record his fifth studio album. Adding an extra dimension to his compositions, the album will introduce Graham’s soulful vocals to his audience for the first time. The album is set to be released in April 2015 and will feature a combination of his exemplary guitar work and smooth vocals punctuated throughout with elements of funk, motown, pop and blues.

With Graham bringing an innovative sound to the industry, it wasn’t long before Canada’s top booking agency, The Feldman Agency, also counted themselves a fan of Graham’s music. So much in fact, that in July 2014, they decided to partner Graham with renowned Canadian producer Gavin Brown (Billy Talent, Metric, The Tragically Hip) on his “Sessions X” series. The series was recorded at Toronto’s Five-Star “Noble Street Studios” and features Graham alongside a number of acclaimed musicians including; Tears For Fears, Feist, Three Days Grace, Metric, and Ron Sexsmith.

The series is expected to be released in the Fall of 2014, along with two singles “Burning Up” and “Tabula Rasa” (CandyRat Records).

If you want to hear Calum’s exemplary guitar playing skills, visit his YouTube channel and follow him on Twitter. You can also like his Facebook page.

1. How would you describe your personal brand?

Contemporary fingerstyle guitar with a modern edge (using effects, vocals, & loops) bringing a niche genre of music to a mainstream audience.

2. What sets you apart from other artists?

My extensive training in classical and fingerstyle guitar gives my original music the advantage of having a very strong melodic and harmonic foundation. This has allowed me to open up shows, tour, and record albums with some of the best artists/guitarists in my field (ex. Tommy Emmanuel, Andy McKee, Don Ross).

3. Where do you see yourself in five years time?

I see myself taking my music to a world stage by touring internationally, continuing to collaborating with a plethora of top-tier artists, continuing to develop my craft as a musician/songwriter/guitarist, and ultimately, continuing to release great music for my fans.

4. What made you interested in the music industry?

To be honest, it was never about the music industry. I was first interested in the music. When I was 13 years old, I picked up my first guitar, and haven’t been able to put it down ever since. 10 years later I’m still a guitar nerd at heart, and there isn’t a day that goes by when I don’t play my guitar. My love for music overtime eventually developed into a career in the music industry.

5. What is success to you? What does it feel like?

Success to me is always about connecting with my fans. It’s my fans that are pushing me to write the best music I’m capable of.  Because of my fans, I’m able to do what I love and see the world through sharing music – and to me that feels pretty amazing.

An acoustic adventure

Published on FAME Canada: Sept. 16, 2014

When Conor Gains was invited to join the Iridium Jazz Club stage by the late Les Paul, little did he know he was on the road to becoming one of Canada’s rising bluegrass artists.

The Cambridge, Ont. native first picked up his father’s acoustic guitar when he was eight, and since then has developed an attachment to the instrument. He has excited audiences in Memphis, Nashville, Cleveland, Montreal, Toronto and all across southern Ontario.

Cambridge native Conor Gains has graced numerous stages throughout Canada.

One day, Conor decided to rummage through his father’s music collection and discovered who he wanted to be like in the world of entertainment.

“I immersed myself in the music of guitarists such as Eric Clapton, Rory Gallagher, Alvin Lee, Steve Ray Vaughan, Jeff Beck and Jimi Hendrix,” he said. “I was so inspired by their raw talents, and I always asked myself, ‘What else should I listen to?’”

Conor began performing live at blues jams in Cambridge when he was 12. Seasoned musicians around the area encouraged him and allowed him make guest appearances at their shows. After a while, he gained enough confidence to cultivate his craft and reach his maximum potential and form his own band.

“When I was in junior high, I met Joel Goodman, a really competent drummer,” said Conor. “We formed a partnership and we were joined by various bass players. We’ve been playing live shows around Ontario ever since.”

Calling themselves The Conor Gains Band, the group played the 2007 Escarpment Blues Festival in Milton, where Conor was honoured to have Leo Lyons, bass player for British blues legends “Ten Years After” wish him a happy 14th birthday during their headline performance.

“That was just the beginning of my inspiration,” he said. “Meeting other performers such as Savoy Brown’s Kim Simmonds and blues guitarist Walter Trout is what really got me going.”

During the fall that same year, Conor and his journalist father embarked on a “father and son rock & roll trip,” where he played at the B.B. King’s Blues Clubs in Nashville and Memphis as well as Wet Willie’s on Memphis’s famed Beale Street. He played two nights to record crowds at the latter venue as a guest of the Victor Wainwright Blues Band.

In January 2008, The Conor Gains Band played at Toronto’s legendary music venue, the Horseshoe Tavern. Talent buyer Craig Liskey said that “Conor was absolutely amazing, and that everyone was raving about him and his band.”

Since then, the band has sold out three straight shows at Cambridge’s Café 13 where he started jamming as a 12-year-old.

Conor Gains is now at the tender age of 21, and 2014 has been a year of great accomplishments for him and his band.

This past July, the band won the 2014 Toronto Blues Society “Talent Search” competition and set out on a nationwide tour. They will also be given a showcase slot at the 2015 Toronto Blues Summit (a biannual gathering of the Canadian blues scene), a spot at the Aurora Winter Blues Festival, rehearsal time at Cherry Jam Rehearsal Studio in Toronto and consideration to represent the Toronto Blues Society at the 2015 International Blues Challenge in Memphis.

The Conor Gains Band’s latest album, “Run Away with the Night” is available right now on iTunes and Amazon, and is distributed by CD Baby.

Each song was written or co-written by Conor, with the band including Mack Jordan on guitar and vocals, Aaron Hernandez on drums and vocals and Mikey Vukovich on bass. Special guests include Jerome Godboo, a 2014 International Blues Challenge harmonica player winner, the 24th Street Wailers and Matt Weidlinger.

A talent discovered from the comfort of home

Published on FAME Canada: Sept. 16, 2014

Just playing a song at a gig doesn’t cut it for Jordan McIntosh. He wants to make sure he feels emotionally connected with his music, and that his audience does as well.

Jordan McIntosh

“My favourite songs are the ones I relate to the most, so I tend to sing about things I’ve experienced personally,” the Carleton Place, Ontario-based country artist said. “Music is the best form of therapy for me.”

This has had a major impact on the songs Jordan has recorded to date, namely “That Girl,” the first single from his 2014 début record, which will be released by IROC Music and distributed by Big Star and Universal Music Canada.

“Last year, something happened in my life that was really difficult to deal with,” said Jordan. “So I sat down and wrote out my feelings, called up some other writers and asked for their take on it. It’s the most personal song I’ve ever written.”

Jordan found out he could sing after watching his older sister perform. After his family discovered his soulful voice, they encouraged him to take every opportunity to get up on stage. He won his first vocal competition in elementary school and performed at local talent contests around Ontario and the United States, including Walt Disney World’s “American Idol” Experience.

A YouTube video of his winning performance of “Amazed” by Lonestar at a local Kiwanis Idol competition attracted the attention of Neville Paul and Ryan O’Connor of IROC Music and NPMG Management.

“They called my parents out of the blue and said, ‘We believe in your son and think he would make a career out of this and we’d like to help,’” said Jordan. “The decision to meet with them was the best my family and I have ever made.”

Paul and O’Connor have helped Jordan develop his skills as a singer, performer and songwriter.  This has led him to undertaking a national promotional tour, playing at the Ottawa Bluesfest and the Emerging Artist Showcase at the Boots and Hearts Music Festival, and singing the national anthem at an Ottawa Senators game.

In 2013, Jordan released a music video for “Grew Up in a Country Song,” which earned him the title of Fresh Face Feature Artison CMT Canada in November and a holiday single entitled “Christmas Time.” He also appeared in the CMT video “Home for Christmas” alongside George Canyon.

During his rise to stardom, Jordan has participated in a number of charitable events, including the Almonte General Hospital Fundraising Ceremony and the Relay of Life, which raised over $117,000 for the fight against cancer.

Keep in mind that Jordan is only turning 19-years-old at the end of December, and has a voice and depth of emotional range beyond his years.

His talents are as evident on his 2012 début single, “Walk Away” as they are on his countrified version of Lil’ Wayne’s “How To Love,” which has garnered over 251,000 views on YouTube. He shows confidence that artists with far more years on stage behind him would find enviable.

“I’ll admit there have been sacrifices along the way, but they’ve been worth it,” said Jordan. “It’s difficult to balance school, friends and life, but this is my passion and a dream that’s started to become a reality over the past year. There’s nothing else I’m focusing on. All my attention is going into this.”

It’s time to research Canadian television viewers

It’s unfair that Canada always gets excluded from televised talent scouting. No matter what, every attempt at displaying fresh Canadian talent has fallen flat on our faces.

Let’s take a trip back to the Canadian Idol days. The first five seasons were ratings juggernauts, yet the sixth (and ultimately final) season took a nosedive in viewership. Idol routinely drew in over 2 million viewers per episode in the early years, and only 1.3 to 1.6 million people tuned into the competition during summer 2008. Producers noticed the ratings dip, and recruited R&B singer-songwriter Jully Black as a mentor, critic and vocal coach. Unfortunately, that wasn’t enough to rekindle the show’s magic.

Canadian Idol host Ben Mulroney.

So You Think You Can Dance, Canada! suffered a similar fate. Although over 1 million people followed the show’s final season in summer 2011, CTV cancelled it, citing viewership and the economic climate as deciding factors. Numbers for the finale that year were down almost 30 per cent from the previous year.

Canada’s Got Talent is the most recent talent competition to get the axe, and the only one to not progress past its freshman year. CityTV noted that high production costs and low ratings (its finale didn’t even cress 1 million viewers) were the reasons for its cancellation, but the network expressed interest in reviving the series in the future.

(From left to right) Canada’s Got Talent host Dina Pugliese, Stephan Moccio, Measha Brueggergosman and Martin Short.

After examining each show, I find the issue isn’t talent itself, but a lack of viewer interest.

We could banter all day as to why this is the case and still be totally off. The only way we’ll know is by conducting solid market research. Of course, we can’t just target Canadian television viewers in general, as that wouldn’t yield accurate results. Each market is entertained differently, whether it’s through satirical news broadcasts, reality shows, or sitcoms.

The median viewer age for Canadian Idol was 33 in 2007, and 45 in 2008, while So You Think You Can Dance, Canada! attracted younger viewers (aged 18-34 roughly).

In this case, Canadians aged 21-50 (who watch television for more than two hours a week) could be surveyed. This would determine why they gradually lose interest in Canadian talent competitions, and what would persuade them to follow one.

Who knows? Lighting or audio issues could be detracting Canadians from tuning into Idol, Dance or Got Talent. We won’t know unless we find out for ourselves. Without solid viewership and interest, a television show is meaningless.

The Olympics of entertainment

Simon Cowell has teased a global “Got Talent” for four years. Plans to actually make this show a reality have been halted constantly, because Simon believes it would hamper with his commitments with Britain’s Got Talent and The X Factor.

A&R executive and producer Simon Cowell.

The “World’s Got Talent” came to light again two weeks ago, when it was reported that the show would be held in India, under the title of Got Talent World Stage LIVE. It would take place sometime in December of this year, and be hosted by Bollywood star Shah Rukh Khan.

Simon has made no official announcement regarding this event. As it stands, it’s only a rumour, but I really hope it sees the light of day.

Considering the Got Talent franchise set a world record earlier this year, there’s so much that could be explored. If done carefully, a global Got Talent show could be one of the most-watched events on television this decade.

I’ve created a list of what I believe could make Got Talent World Stage LIVE a success.

1. Abandon the “contest” format.

Cast your minds back to 2003’s World Idol. 11 Idol winners around the world went through another competition to vie for the title of “World Idol.” The premise seemed brilliant at first glance, but there were many issues with its execution.

For one thing, the show featured judges from Idol series around the world (one from each participating country), offering little to no constructive feedback. As Simon Cowell put it after the one-off series ended, it “turned Idol winners into losers.” It was also panned by critics worldwide, despite favourable ratings (approximately 1.9 million Canadian viewers tuned in to the special).

Formatting a global Got Talent event as a competition would be counter-intuitive, because performers have already poured enough blood, sweat and tears into competing. They’ve gone as far as they could in their respective Got Talent show, so a competition would create unnecessary pressure.

2. Hold the event in a similar fashion to the Olympics.

This shouldn’t just be a one-off event, nor should it be held annually. I know this would depend on how well the programme does in ratings (and whether it can sustain reasonable production costs), but for arguments sake, let’s suppose this event became a hit.

Got Talent World Stage LIVE should be held every two years, each time in a different country. That way, performers could gain more exposure in different parts of the world.

3. Grant performance slots to “Got Talent” winners.

When news of Got Talent World Stage LIVE came to light, it was hinted that dance duo Paddy & Nico and Canadian magician Darcy Oake (both of whom competed on Britain’s Got Talent) would represent Great Britain.

The thing is, neither contestant won this series, so I don’t think they should be taking a spot on the world stage. Instead, the show should borrow the same concept World Idol had, in which all performers were winners of their respective shows. This could also give Got Talent competitors more of a “push” to win the top prize, which would then be a chance at global domination (not really, but it’d still be a chance at the rest of the world seeing a person’s abilities).

I have high hopes for this potential event, it could become the Olympics of entertainment if the right steps are taken. A part of me will be disappointed if the supposed plans for Got Talent World Stage LIVE fall through, because it’s an opportunity to showcase various cultures on a global platform.

America’s Got Talent: Cool it on the “joke” acts

I’ve watched America’s Got Talent for five seasons, and it seems like “joke acts” are put through every year on purpose.

From 2010 to 2013, we’ve seen Mary Ellen, Those Funny Little People, Big Barry and Tone the Chiefrocca take a spot in the quarterfinals, while truly talented performers get shafted. This season, Juan Carlos, a man on rollerblades, will be performing at Radio City Music Hall.

(From left to right) America’s Got Talent host Nick Cannon, and judges Heidi Klum, Howard Stern, Mel B, and Howie Mandel.

By advancing bad acts that should have been sent home in the auditions (or at least during Judgement Week), it makes the judges seem like they’re not serious about finding true talent. Their jobs are to weed through performers that aren’t worth the top prize, and advance those that could not only win the contest, but find a place in American culture.

If this were a Saturday night variety show, a few joke acts would be acceptable. However, this is America’s Got Talent, a competition with a $1,000,000 prize and a headlining show in Las Vegas.

Some people might tell you to have a laugh by watching a joke act, but I just don’t see the humour in it. Watching a performer who’s purposely bad at Radio City Music Hall is unacceptable, especially when I know someone with a genuine gift is on the outside looking in.

America’s Got Talent is the only show of its kind, auditioning comedians, magicians, and variety acts along with singers and dancers. If truly talented folks get the boot, where else can they go?

It also seems hypocritical when an act gets ostracized for making a single mistake, yet a purposely bad performer is sent through for “entertainment.” The judges are unknowingly making themselves look implausible, like they’re not seeking out raw talent.

If this unfairness continues in future seasons, viewers might get fed up and stop watching the show. After all, no other reality talent competition (ex. American Idol, So You Think You Can Dance, The Voice) has joke acts in their semifinals stage, so why should America’s Got Talent get away with it?